The Major Changes in The Layouts of The Landed Casinos

From the labyrinth to the playground
In the 1990s and early 2000s, when Las Vegas was experiencing its first birth pangs and huge gaming palaces were opened on “The Strip”, casino designers largely adopted the theory of the maze layout.
The idea was that the casino would quickly suck the player into a maze and make it difficult to leave. The concept of a labyrinth was widely accepted and penetrated the mythology of Vegas’ pop culture. That is why there are no clocks on the wall and no windows in the casinos. It is often said that this confuses the players’ sense of time.
Casino elements but the labyrinth layout was best seen on the floor, where the slot machines were no longer lined up as they were in the 1960s, but in arbitrary crooked lines. Once inside, a player needs several minutes to exit – and hopefully put a few coins in one of the machines. The overarching idea of ​​the maze is to hide the exits by sparse signage and that the player can see a variety of slot machines or tables from anywhere.
With the changed new design for landed casinos, the ceilings were made higher and casinos made sure that the sunlight peeks through the window into the casino.
Casinos also changed their interiors into an open view.
There would be sculptures put up or any impressive art and a small cluster of game will be placed surrounding the art.
As the year 2010 approached, the casino design underwent its first major change in ten years, thanks to the opening of higher quality facilities such as Bellagio and Wynn. Yesterday’s low-hanging ceilings were now sky-high (often with the sky painted on) and the labyrinth left room for smaller groups of slot machines and more space. An incoming player saw no more slot machines. He saw sculptures and sunlight and wide avenues leading to the gaming tables.
This concept became known as the “playground”, with the idea of ​​transforming the casino from a place of confusion and fear into a high-quality palace where players could feel comfortable and enthusiastic, surrounded by abundance everywhere. The casinos turned into inviting wellness facilities – places where people willing to spend money, even if the chances of winning were not favourable.
The playground design has been incredibly successful in enticing players to play, and designers have drawn impressive psychological lessons on the occasion. Relaxed players are happier when they win and more understanding when they lose – both of them convince them to keep betting.
The floor layout has been changed from a confusing type to a more open and inviting “playground” concept.